DIY Native Plant Landscape Design Clinic on Oct 27

Saturday, August 27, 2018 from 9-2 pm
College of the Sequoias in Visalia

presented by Melanie Keeley,
Native Plant Specialist, Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Parks
and Cathy Capone, former owner of Cal Natives Nursery in Porterville,
Alta Peak Chapter Horticulture Chair

With California’s unpredictable precipitation, it is time for new landscape style that will work in this hot, arid climate. California native plants use a fraction of the water that typical garden plants do, while being attractive and colorful as well. Designed for native plant novices, this class will help you learn practical applications related to 1) ditching your lawn, 2) tried and true native plants, 3) combining native plants for maximum color and effect, and 4) how to design your own drought tolerant native garden. Once a landscape plan is in place, the landscape can be installed in manageable steps. This class provides a great opportunity to transition from a high care, water indulgent garden into a natural, sustainable low water use, beautiful garden.

Registration Fee CNPS Members – $45, Non-members – $60

Pre-registration is required. Class size is limited.
Call Melanie Keeley at 559-799-7438 to register.

By joining the Alta Peak Chapter of the California Native Plant Society during the clinic, 
you will be eligible to pre-order your chosen native plants prior to our October 6, Annual Fall Plant Sale at a 10% discount.


photo of CA native annuals in the garden by Melanie Keeley

Giant Sequoia National Monument Field Trip on July 21

July 21, 2018 from 8 -3 pm

Lead by Barbara Brydolf, Alta Peak Chapter President

Come explore a Giant Sequoia Grove in the Sequoia National Monument above Springville. In the heat of summer, find shelter under the canopy of the giants. We will explore either the Wheel Meadow Grove above Camp Nelson or the Black Mountain Grove near Mountain Aire. We may see mountain misery (Chamaebatia foliolosa), thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus), Hartweg’s wild ginger (Asarum hartwegii), and could see California tiger lily (Lilium pardalinum), stream orchid (Epipactis gigantea), scarlet bugler (Penstemon centranthifolius), and Scouler’s St. John’s wort (Hypericum scouleri).

Meet at the Springville Veterans Memorial Park, on the right side of Hwy 190 between Gifford’s Market and the Fire Station in downtown Springville. We will carpool and caravan up the highway. Expect as much as a five mile hike over varied terrain and elevations around 4500-5500 feet.

Bring lunch and water. Wear sturdy shoes and be prepared for sun and mosquitoes.

For more information, contact Barbara Brydolf at bbrydolf@gmail.com or 559-359-2827.

photo via Valley Public Radio
fron an episode of Here and Now with Ezra David Romero,

Big Meadow Wildflower Field Trip on June 23


Saturday, June 23, 2018 from 8:30 am – early afternoon
Lead by Mary Merriman, Alta Peak Chapter Rare Plant Chair
and Denise Griego, Alta Peak Chapter Secretary

Explore the high altitude flora of Sequoia National Forest Hume Lake District, located between Giant Forest and Grant Grove. Big Meadow has the highest altitude with accessible roads in Tulare County. Its subalpine flora is dominated by lodgepole pine, white/red fir forest on exfoliated granite. 
It will still be late spring there! We may find a few relatively rare plants, such as Tulare County buckwheat and Sierra bleeding heart and we may find several kinds of monkey flowers although they are more unpredictable in dryish years. Wet meadows hide many floral treasures throughout the season. Shady stream banks harbor a variety of shrubs.

From Three Rivers area, meet at the Veterans Memorial Building on Hwy 198 at 8:30 am for carpooling. Try to bring the fewest number of cars possible. From Visalia area, we will be taking the shorter route up Hwy 180 through the Kings Canyon entrance. If you are coming from Visalia area, contact Mary Merriman at 559-679-9152 or marymtnspirit@gmail.com for directions up Hwy 180 or for ride-sharing, especially if you do not have a park pass. There is now a $35 entrance fee to the National Parks, so be sure to bring your annual or senior pass.

Meet on the Big Meadow road at 10:30 am at the first parking lot (map link here). There is only one way to turn at the Big Meadow Road but it has a fairly small sign. About 1/4 mile up the Big Meadow road, there is a gate (which will be open) and large parking lot on the right with an outhouse where we will start. We will mostly be driving or walking with no significant hiking but plenty of uneven ground so wear sturdy boots. Bring lunch, water, sunscreen, hat, layered clothing (mornings can be cool), field guides and a lawn chair for lunch.


Big Meadow photo by Denise Griego

 

Native Tree Planting along the Tule River Parkway

Saturday May 12, 2018 from 8 am – 12 noon

Sponsored by the Tule River Parkway Association, Noon Rotary of Porterville, City of Porterville,
Porterville Unified School District and Alta Peak Chapter of the California Native Plant Society

Help is needed to advise teams of high school students as they plant 23 or more native trees along the Parkway path, including valley oak, California sycamore, western redbud, and Fresno ash. Please wear sturdy shoes and wear sun protection. If possible, bring a shovel to share. Water will be provided.

Meet at at the Sears parking lot on Jaye Street just south of the river in Porterville.
For more information, and to sign up, please contact Cathy Capone at cathycaponemail@gmail.com or 559-361-9164.

[photo of redbud branch in bloom © Cathy Capone]

March 25 Field Trip: Fire Effects in Blue Oak Woodland

Sunday, March 25, 2018 from 9:30 – 12:30 pm at the River Ridge Ranch in Springville

Gary Adest of River Ridge Institute, Alta Peak Chapter President Barbara Brydolf, and forest experts Nina Hemphill and Ernie Garcia will lead this field trip to see how the Pier Fire has changed blue oak (Quercus douglasii) woodland on the lower slopes of Lumreau Mountain. We will explore the effects of the fire on soil, vegetation, and wildlife, and discuss the function of fire in the landscape. Expect to see wildflowers on this walk.

Meet at 9:30 am in the lower parking lot of River Ridge Ranch, located at 37675 Balch Park Rd, on the east side of the road, 1.6 mi. north of the White Barn in Springville. The walk will be moderately strenuous, approximately 5 miles, with a 1000’ elevation gain. Bring lunch and water and dress appropriately.

[photo credit: River Ridge Institute]

Native Plant Landscape Plans for Tule River Parkway

Tule River Parkway Association Meeting
March 13, 2018 at 5:30 pm
Porterville Historic Museum (located at 257 North D Street in Porterville)

The Tule River Parkway Association (TRPA) invites anyone to attend this meeting, who is interested in preservation and restoration of the Tule River riparian corridor. TRPA will discuss partnering with the City of Porterville to submit a grant proposal to the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The proposal will include plans for development for public use and for the installation and maintenance of eighteen native plant landscape gardens along the Tule River Parkway path. A landscape plan with specific native plants, to be planted in the cool months only, will be part of the grant proposal. Public input is welcome. The Alta Peak Chapter of the California Native Plant Society enthusiastically supports this project.

For more information, email tulerivergarden@gmail.com or call Cathy Capone at 559-361-9164.

[“California Wild Rose” photo © Cathy Capone]

Adaptation of Plants, Animals and Humans to Wildfires: What to Expect Following the Pier Fire

Alta Peak Chapter events are free and open to the public.

Saturday, February 24, 2018  at 7pm (social time starts at 6:30)

Chapter Winter Program
“Adaptation of Plants, Animals and Humans to Wildfires:
What to Expect Following the Pier Fire”

with Dr. Jon Keeley, fire ecologist/research scientist for the United States Geological Survey
and adjunct professor UCLA

Springville Veterans’ Memorial Building on Hwy 190

Wildfires are a necessary part of the ecology of many wild landscapes in mediterranean-type climates across the globe, promoting healthy wildlands and biodiversity. After an explosive fire year in California, many questions arise as humans more commonly move into areas that are subject to burning. Dr. Keeley will provide an overview of the fire history of Sierra Nevada forests and shrublands, describing interesting ways plants and animals have adapted to survive wildfires. This talk will touch on important issues related to the wildland-urban interface, as well as the future in an era of global change.

Saturday, February 24, from 1-4 pm
Field Trip: Pier Fire Area

before Winter Program in Springville

Led by Jon Keeley and Barbara Brydolf, this field will be mostly driving along Hwy 190 above Springville with stops at various overlooks, and a short hike on steep terrain (this could be skipped by people who want to go on the excursion, but are unable to do the hike).

Meet at the Springville Veteran’s Memorial Building at 1 pm to caravan and carpool. Carpooling is encouraged, as pull-outs along Hwy 190 are limited.

After the field trip and before the program, join Chapter members for dinner at Nuevo Mexicali III restaurant in Springville, located at: 35258 Hwy 190.