Tule River Parkway Workshop in Porterville on Feb 23, 2019 from 9-11 am

Cathy Capone will be leading a citizen science project to document the plant populations along the Tule River Parkway path in Porterville. Part of the Tule River Parkway Association’s plans to preserve and restore the Tule River riparian corridor is to document the existing vegetation, both good and bad.

Cathy will be using and demonstrating the use of Observer Pro to document locations of plants along the paved paths. Observer Pro is an application for smart phones that allows you to quickly and efficiently report wild plant occurrences. This application makes it easy for you to report the species name, date, and location of over 10,000 California native and non-native plant taxa. You can also add a photograph to a report and share it with others later to confirm identification. Your reports are transmitted wirelessly to the Calflora database, where you can edit them and see them on a map.

Download the app Observer Pro before the walk if you want to learn on your own device. Meet at the trail entrance lot off Jaye Street.  Enter from southbound lanes just south of Tule River Bridge rail. Easy walk 1 mile, no elevation gain. Wear closed toe shoes, bring water, no restrooms are available.

For more information, email tulerivergarden@gmail.com or call Cathy Capone at 559-361-9164.

Tule River Parkway Walk in Porterville — January 19 from 9-11 am

Alta Peak Chapter Horticulture Chair, Cathy Capone, will lead this walk, designed to highlight the native vegetation along the Tule River and to discuss plans to enhance the area. The walk will be on an easy, flat, paved trail that is wheelchair accessible. The walk is free and open to the public.

The Tule River Parkway Association, in cooperation with the City of Porterville, Partners for Fish and Wildlife, and the Alta Peak Chapter are working to preserve and restore the Tule River riparian corridor in Porterville. The plan is to develop the Tule River Parkway path for public use and to install eighteen native plant landscape gardens. Alta Peak Chapter has pledged to adopt one of these gardens and looks forward to participating in the restoration of the natural riparian landscape.

Wear closed-toed shoes, bring water, and make not that no restrooms are available. Meet at the Tule River Parkway in Porterville on Jaye Street, just south of the bridge over the river. Access is from the south bound lane only- no left turns are allowed at that location, so north bound traffic should make the first available U-turn on Jaye Stree.

Call Cathy Capone at 559-361-9164 or email at tulerivergarden@gmail.com for more information.

26th Annual Springfest Home and Patio Show — February 8-10, 2019

Alta Peak Chapter will be joining other horticulture-related booths in the Garden Center area of the 26th Annual Springfest Home and Patio Show at Visalia Convention Center. The Chapter will be there to spread the word about native plants and their uses in the personal garden landscape. Find books about native plant gardening and identification, California wildflower posters, and some native plants.

Hours: Fri 11-6 pm, Sat 10-7 pm, Sun 10-5 pm

Contact Barbara Brydolf at bbrydolf@gmail.com for more information.

We will need help from Chapter members at the booth during the open hours and for set up and take down. Contact Barbara to sign up.


DIY Native Plant Landscape Design Clinic on Oct 27

Saturday, August 27, 2018 from 9-2 pm
College of the Sequoias in Visalia

presented by Melanie Keeley,
Native Plant Specialist, Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Parks
and Cathy Capone, former owner of Cal Natives Nursery in Porterville,
Alta Peak Chapter Horticulture Chair

With California’s unpredictable precipitation, it is time for new landscape style that will work in this hot, arid climate. California native plants use a fraction of the water that typical garden plants do, while being attractive and colorful as well. Designed for native plant novices, this class will help you learn practical applications related to 1) ditching your lawn, 2) tried and true native plants, 3) combining native plants for maximum color and effect, and 4) how to design your own drought tolerant native garden. Once a landscape plan is in place, the landscape can be installed in manageable steps. This class provides a great opportunity to transition from a high care, water indulgent garden into a natural, sustainable low water use, beautiful garden.

Registration Fee CNPS Members – $45, Non-members – $60

Pre-registration is required. Class size is limited.
Call Melanie Keeley at 559-799-7438 to register.

By joining the Alta Peak Chapter of the California Native Plant Society during the clinic, 
you will be eligible to pre-order your chosen native plants prior to our October 6, Annual Fall Plant Sale at a 10% discount.


photo of CA native annuals in the garden by Melanie Keeley

DIY Native Plant Landscape Design Clinic

Plant photos by Melanie Keeley, from left to right:
yerba mansa (Anemopsis californica)
deergrass (Muhlenbergia rigens) and Idaho bluegrass (Festuca idahoensis)
Douglas iris (Iris douglasiana)


Saturday, August 26, 2017, from 9-2 pm
Instructors: Melanie Keeley and Cathy Capone
College of the Sequoias in Visalia
(exact room will be given at time of registration)

Registration Fee: CNPS Members – $45, Non-members – $60.00
Pre-registration is required. Class size is limited.
Call 559-799-7438 for registration as well as questions.

The traditional garden of expansive lawns, and lolly-popped shrubs are a thing of the past. With California’s unpredictable precipitation, it is time for a new model that will work in this hot, arid climate. California native plants not only use a fraction of the water that typical gardens do, they are attractive and colorful as well. In this class, designed for native plant novices, we will help you learn

  • how to ditch your lawn
  • the best tried and true native plants
  • how to combine them for maximum effect
  • help you to design your own drought tolerant native garden.

With a plan in place, you can landscape your garden in manageable steps. It’s an opportunity to transition from a high care, water indulgent garden into a natural, sustainable low water use, beautiful garden.

By joining CNPS at this time, you’ll be eligible to pre-order native plants for the Annual Fall Plant Sale (October 7) at a 10% discount.



Native Plant Garden at the CAL Fire Station in Three Rivers, California
Created and supported by the Redbud Garden Club, maintained by firefighters

 

“Caring for Kaweah”
 A River Stewardship Program

The expansion of the invasive plant, Spanish broom, along the Kaweah River in recent years is cause for concern and has captured the attention of those who are considering doing something about it.  In fact, a growing list of individuals, private businesses and organizations, throughout Tulare County have begun planning the launch of “Caring for Kaweah,” a long-term project aimed at river stewardship.

Removing Spanish broom along the Kaweah River by Ginger BradshawRemoving Spanish Broom on September 24 near Sequoia National Park
photo by Ginger Bradshaw

The first of several proposed projects will focus on broom removal and was planned for National Public Lands Day (NPLD).  On September 24, 2016,  volunteers cut, pulled, and removed broom starting in Sequoia National Park and working downriver.  Considering that we rely on the Kaweah River for so much — water, recreation, relaxation, inspiration in addition to commerce, we are pulling together and giving back to keep our river healthy, free, wild, and beautiful.

Many Three Rivers locals and visitors have probably appreciated the colorful spring beauty of the non-native Spanish broom (Spartium junceum) blanketing the edge and creeping up the banks of the Kaweah River. Unfortunately, broom, a native to mediterranean-type climates, is aggressively invasive in our region because the insect pests and pathogens that would normally control its spread in its native range, are not present here. Due to the lack of natural control, it is rapidly becoming dominant in the river corridor, obscuring river views, and cloaking white sand, gravel, and smooth granite boulders under dense scrubby thickets. Recognizing the plant’s capacity to considerably alter the enjoyment and ecology of our Kaweah River watershed goes a long way to temper appreciation of its flowers.

Spanish broom, like other invasive species expanding into the river corridor, poses a significant threat to wildlands throughout California and is quickly becoming a thriving monoculture along the Kaweah River. One needs only to glance at the river in spring to note the extent to which it has spread. Bushes up to 10 feet tall now block views along lengthy river stretches. As broom grows, its vast root system usurps precious water, trapping sediment, altering river flows and obstructing river access to humans and animals alike. Unlike the native willow, sycamore, and alder it is displacing, it provides little in terms of shade. Its alkaloid-containing leaves and seeds are of little value to wildlife. stands of broom pose a significant fire hazard in this land of continual drought.

To participate or get more info, contact Jenny Kirk at jenny_kirk@nps.gov, or call (559) 565-4232. She will provide you with meeting location information for future outings.

Spanish Broom, invasive plant by Melanie KeeleyInvasive plant—Spanish Broom
photo by Melanie Keeley